Monday, May 26, 2014

Firehouse project




I've been sitting on a disassembled Railway Design Associates plastic building for some time. I built it several years ago but tore it apart shortly after using half of it for the stucco building you see in a lot of my photos. For the other half, I have used styrene clapboard sides with Tichy windows and doors to make this firehouse. The first floor is styrene boxcar siding to give a wooden floor look. And the second floor and roof are just sheet styrene. The roof has black paper strips applied for a finish.


















Everything was sprayed black, inside and out. Then the brick front and rear were sprayed with an acrylic craft paint mixture of Terra Cotta and Crimson Red. The side walls were done in a blue and the windows and doors were hand painted a slightly lighter blue color.  The ivy is 'old man's beard' a lichen growing here, that was sprayed dark brown and while wet, laid on a piece of glass flat and tea leaves were sprinkled over it.  Once dry it was touched up with a little green paint and glued to the wall.





   The engine here is a 1934 Ford built from the '34 Ford bus from Jordan. The chassis was glued in upside down and the body was scratch built. The windscreen is from a model T and the hose reel and fittings on the pumper sides are scratch built.  The top photo shows the completed station.





   One more Roco Zis 5 turned Autocar here for this wrecker. A scratch built bed and wrecker unit make up this truck.







   One last pic for this post is a Model T touring car from Jordan, pretty much as it is intended to be built. I did take some liberties on the colors. I doubt if many were this colorful.




    With that one, this Memorial Day, I will leave you all so you may give the thanks deserved by all those that have donned a uniform in the service of our country.


3 comments:

Galen Gallimore said...

I recognize that brick front (and back)! I have also kitbashed the basic RDA/ERTL structure and recognize the inherent limitations of the brickwork. Seems like the corners don't line up like they should, and a few other minor problems. You've gotten around that using the wood siding walls and made a simple, but purposeful structure with classic lines. Great work, and thanks for sharing!

Gernia said...

Chester, your work is amazing. Gernia

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